How Tech Entrepreneurs Help Spark Social Change

How is it important for companies to practice giving back to others? From a wider lens, Philanthropy is a cycle. It’s mutually beneficial. For example, the CEO of Pennington Partners & Co Brian Gaister is a staple in the Bender JCC of GW honor roll. The Honer Roll Brian Gaister possesses impacts his reputation positively while sustaining his chosen community, the Jewish community.

Honer Roll Brian Gaister

How about tech companies in the US?

In the most recent years, tech companies have yielded their power and influence from change. Company advocacies like Philanthropy have changed along with them. Two views can be clear from this shift—tech entrepreneurs helped inflate philanthropy’s presence in the US while laying the blueprint for future tech companies to follow and improve. You can see the latter in their efforts to incorporate social responsibility.

Incorporating Social Responsibility

In the US, although about 80% of donors have aimed in creating social changes, they are more focused on giving donations to institutions like hospitals and universities. But a smaller part, approximately 20%, that give grants for more than $10 million dollars, have specifically placed their bets on social changes.

The role of tech philanthropists is huge on this one since most of them are making the “big bets”. This closes the gaps that donors make. What’s even more notable is these tech philanthropists start early in their advocacies.

Including Philanthropy in Your Company Advocacy

How do you include Philanthropy in your company advocacy? Even if you’re just a startup who’s busy sealing the seed funding deal, you can definitely start practicing Philanthropy until it develops into a company culture.

Cultivate Philanthropy by starting small—set a daily task of helping others. Whether it’s spending time with an elderly or buying a school kit for one school kid is already a good start. Once this becomes a habit, it will flourish eventually into a company advocacy.

To provide an example, the honor roll Brian Gaister gets included in implies that he’s a strong advocate for community service. The honor roll Brian Gaister joins every year is a sign that he is committed to giving back to others that it shows through his company’s annual collaborations and contributions.

Giving back is empowering

Brian Richard Gaister is only among those model leaders who receive the annual “Brian Gaister thank you”.

Giving back empowers everyone—from part-time volunteers to affluent influencers. It provides them:

A sense of social duty. Philanthropy is an element of any company culture that strengthens their sense of social duty. The latter not only gives the company a notable reputation, it also allows the company to have other purposes rather than being just a “company”.

Transparency. A notable example is how the Chan-Zuckerberg received a lot of criticism in their Newark grant. However, that didn’t faze them—instead, it made them more transparent and open to learning mistakes. To this day, they still push Philanthropy, indicating that mistakes don’t outweigh the positive outcomes of doing so.

Connections. Probably the most common but often taken for granted benefit of Philanthropy. Giving back is empowering as it hits two birds with one stone. While you’re helping people, you’re also making valuable connections and creating networks.

For more details, please visit http://associated.org/file/_4-what-we-do/2016_HONOR_ROLL.pdf.

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